Meet Peter Weber, Our Legendary Snowsports Director

Peter Weber (lovingly known as Webbie) is Waterville Valley’s Snowsports Director overseeing the Resort’s ski and snowboard programs, teaching everyone from beginners to experts. 

At the end of November 2016 Webbie received the 2016 Einar Aas Award for Excellence in Snowsports School Management. This award recognizes dynamic leadership and achievement, the highest honor in snowsports schools throughout the country. We are very proud of Peter Weber’s longtime accomplishments!

“What is the secret of my success? Loving what you do. Everybody who works here loves to share the passion of sliding on snow. It isn’t an ego thing. It’s all about getting a great feeling by making somebody ski or snowboard better”.

According to Ski NH Magazine, Waterville Valley Resort is the first favorite for adult ski/snowboard lessons in New Hampshire, a place where people learn and progress, and in the meantime...have a lot of fun!

Expert Advice with Peter Weber

What exactly is an expert skier?

There are many ideals of an expert skier these days — from racers, bump skiers and backcountry skiers — that have different looks. No matter what kind of terrain or snow an expert is on they make it seem easy. Their equipment is an extension of their movements and those movements take them down the hill at a pace they choose.

What’s the best way to become a double black diamond master?

Learn how to make really good short turns where you turn your feet and legs across the hill more than the rest of your body. This will keep you in a strong balanced position and allow you to change directions much quicker. This will also allow you to control your speed better and give you the confidence to explore bigger turns and higher speeds when you are ready.

Is it about breaking the bad habits of proverbial intermediate level old-dog skiers and teaching them new tricks? 

Bad habits can stand in the way of getting better. It’s about instilling more efficient moves that take over and eventually replace the bad. It sounds easy but it takes time, repetition and practice. It’s worth the investment though; good technique will get you through or down anything.

What part of this is athletic prowess and what part is mental?

Both of those are important, plus there is an emotional factor. Fear can take over your physical actions and cloud your mental state. It’s not that experts don’t feel fear, they do, but they accept it in a way that allows them to perform.

Why can’t I just ski with buddies who are better than I am and pick up tips from them?

Well, you certainly can, but pick your buddies carefully. There’s a big difference between a random tip and the words of experience from a trained instructor or coach.

What are some of the toughest hurdles — steeps, moguls, powder, trees, ice, etc.?

It’s the combination of those that can be super tough and that’s what makes skiing so interesting and such a challenge. The conditions always change. So, moguls and powder are certainly challenging, but put a layer of ice on top of them and things become extremely challenging.* 

*This article appears in the January 2014 issue of New Hampshire Magazine